Visit our YouTube Channel
Subscribe to Our Blog
Make a Donation
  1. Events
  2. Dr. Jan Willis

Dr. Jan Willis

Jan Willis (BA and MA in Philosophy, Cornell University; PhD in Indic and Buddhist Studies, Columbia University) is Professor Emerita of Religion at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut and now Visiting Professor of Religion at Agnes Scott College in Decatur, GA.  She has studied with Tibetan Buddhists in India, Nepal, Switzerland, and the U.S. for five decades, and has taught courses in Buddhism for over forty-five years.  She is the author of The Diamond Light: An Introduction to Tibetan Buddhist Meditation (1972), On Knowing Reality: The Tattvartha Chapter of Asanga’s Bodhisattvabhumi (1979), Enlightened Beings: Life Stories from the Ganden Oral Tradition (1995); and the editor of Feminine Ground: Essays on Women and Tibet (1989). Additionally, Willis has published numerous articles and essays on various topics in Buddhism—Buddhist meditation, saints’ lives, women and Buddhism, and Buddhism and race.  In 2001, her memoir, Dreaming Me: An African American Woman’s Spiritual Journey was published. It was re-issued in 2008 by Wisdom Publications as Dreaming Me: Black, Baptist, and Buddhist.

In December of 2000, TIME magazine named Willis one of six “spiritual innovators for the new millennium.”  In 2003, she was a recipient of Wesleyan University’s Binswanger Prize for Excellence in Teaching.  She has been profiled in Newsweek magazine and in Ebony magazine which named Willis one of its “Power 150” most influential African Americans. Her latest work is Dharma Matters: Women, Race and Tantra–Collected Essays by Jan Willis, published in April of this year.

Today

Buddhism, Racism and Activism. Talk by Professor Jan Willis

The Black Lives Matter movement, which has become a global rallying cry against racism and police brutality, has shined a light on some of the most uncomfortable and darkest aspects of our history, our society, and ourselves. While we hear calls for the end of racism, violence, and division, we are left with uncomfortable questions. […]